Reader Comments on School Vouchers Issue

MARCO O:

It does not not matter what the law or the first amendment
state. what matters the most is how our society destroying 
all the hopes for the future generation. As a parent of a 5 year old, 
I believe that my daughter deserve a very strict and guided environment. 
She goes to a catholic school in Ohio, I 'm very happy with the school  
and you can tell the difference between public and private. 
Your very ignorant if you say there are no difference.  It is my choice to 
pay for the tuition fee but also I pay my land tax and income tax 
I think it's just right for the public school to compensate some of the 
tuition fee. I'm already working two jobs just to give the best education for 
my 5 year old. I believed that educating young mind properly is the key to 
their success.
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JEANETTE P:

Just a few (admittedly long) thoughts against Reason 4 supporting
vouchers: 

Everyone, regardless of whether they have children, pays for public
schools. Thus, the argument of parents paying twice to send their kids
to a private school holds less water. The argument for vouchers assumes
--correctly in my view-- that one's current taxes go to current
schooling (that is, your parents' taxes are what covered your own public
school "tuition"). But the problem with argument number four for
vouchers is that it also assumes that parents should only pay for public
education if they receive a direct, current benefit from it (i.e., that
they have children using the public school system). 

Contrast this view with real-life statistics: about 20% of women will
never have children, and therefore about 20% of women are paying taxes
on a service they will never use. Also, a person with multiple children
pays the same for public school as a person with only one child. The use
of the service and paying taxes on the service are clearly not related.
Otherwise, the person with more children would pay more in taxes for
public schooling. 

Thus, if private-school parents are allowed to avoid the so-called
"double tax", they in effect *evade* a responsibility shouldered by
everyone else, including the childless. This runs counter to the
principles of tax neutrality (i.e., that taxes --as much as possible--
should not shape people's behavior), and a progressive tax system (i.e.,
that wealthier individuals should pay more than poorer individuals...
assuming that users of the private school system tend to be wealthier
than users of the public school system, elimination of the "double tax"
would effectively result in a *regressive* tax against everyone not
using private schools).



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